The 48 Laws of Power por Joost Elffers, Robert Greene

The 48 Laws of Power por Joost Elffers, Robert Greene

Titulo del libro: The 48 Laws of Power

Autor: Joost Elffers, Robert Greene

ISBN: 0140280197

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Joost Elffers, Robert Greene con The 48 Laws of Power

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Amazon Review
"Learning the game of power requires a certain way of looking at the world, a shifting of perspective", writes Robert Greene. Command of one's emotions and the arts of deception and indirection are, he goes on to assert, essential. The 48 laws outlined in this book "have a simple premise: certain actions always increase one's power ... while others decrease it and even ruin us."

The laws cull their principles from many great schemers--and scheming instructors-- throughout history, from Sun-Tzu to Talleyrand; from Casanovato con man Yellow Kid Weil. They are straightforward in their amoral simplicity: "Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit" or "Discover each man's thumbscrew." Each chapter provides examples of the consequences of observance or transgression of the law, along with "keys to power", potential reversals" (where the converse of the law might also be useful) and a single paragraph cleverly laid out to suggest an image (such as the aforementioned thumbscrew); the margins are filled with illustrative quotations. Practitioners of one-upmanship have been given a new, comprehensive training manual, as up-to-date as it is timeless. -- Jake Bond. --This review refers to the hardback edition of this title.

Review
"Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating . . . a wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top". -- People

Praise for "The 48 Laws of Power"

"It's the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust."
--"New York" magazine


"Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top."
--"People "magazine


"An heir to Machiavelli's "Prince" . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect "vade mecum." "
--"Publishers Weekly"


"Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's "The Rules "meets "In Pursuit of Wow! "with a degree in comparative literature."
--"Allure"

Praise for "The 48 Laws of Power"
"It's the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust."
--"New York" magazine

"Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top."
--"People "magazine

"An heir to Machiavelli's "Prince" . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect "vade mecum." "
--"Publishers Weekly"

"Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's "The Rules "meets "In Pursuit of Wow! "with a degree in comparative literature."
--"Allure"

Praise for "The 48 Laws of Power"
"It's the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust."
--"New York" magazine

"Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top."
--"People "magazine

"An heir to Machiavelli's "Prince" . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect "vade mecum." "
--"Publishers Weekly"

"Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's "The Rules "meets "In Pursuit of Wow! "with a degree in comparative literature."
--"Allure"

Praise for "The 48 Laws of Power"
It s the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust.
"New York" magazine

Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top.
"People "magazine

An heir to Machiavelli s "Prince" . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect "vade mecum. "
"Publishers Weekly"

Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It s "The Rules "meets "In Pursuit of Wow! "with a degree in comparative literature.
"Allure""

Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust. New York magazine
Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top. People magazine
An heir to Machiavelli s Prince . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect vade mecum. Publishers Weekly
Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It s The Rules meets In Pursuit of Wow! with a degree in comparative literature. Allure"

-Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust.---New York magazine
-Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top.---People magazine
-An heir to Machiavelli's Prince . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect vade mecum.- --Publishers Weekly
-Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's The Rules meets In Pursuit of Wow! with a degree in comparative literature.---Allure

"Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust."--New York magazine

"Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top."--People magazine

"An heir to Machiavelli's Prince . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect vade mecum." --Publishers Weekly

"Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's The Rules meets In Pursuit of Wow! with a degree in comparative literature."--Allure

From the Author
The book reflects society--and thus elicits fear
The 48 Laws is designed as a kind of ultimate encyclopedia on the subject. After examining the classic writings on power, from ancient China to modern America, and analyzing the actions of hundreds of historical figures, I deduced certain laws, timeless and definitive. By observing these laws you will gain more power, and by transgressing them you will inevitably suffer a decrease. There are laws that involve pure strategy ("Always make the opponent come to you"), laws that are warnings against dangerous behavior ("Never outshine the Master") and laws that prescribe the use of seduction and deception to cloak the manipulation involved ("Conceal your intentions," "Do not commit to anyone but be courted by all.") These are some of the classic tactics that masters of power inevitably use, but the critic from Kirkus Reviews who critiqued The 48 Laws of Power played one of the oldest power tricks in the book-he or she ignored what the 48 Laws is about, and decided to change the subject, to attack the book for what it isn't. The reviewer, for instance, calls the book "nonsense" because certain laws appear to contradict one another, citing one law that advocates "courting attention at all cost" and another that prescribes "behaving like others" and blending in. But all great writers on power and strategy, from Sun Tzu to Machiavelli, have emphasized the need for constant adaptability and the changing of tactics, never worrying that you might appear to contradict yourself. At one point in your rise to the top you must "court attention at all cost." At other, more dangerous moments, it is critical to blend into the crowd. This is a key theme of The 48 Laws of Power and in fact the last law, Assume Formlessness, advocates complete fluidity. Only those who are inept at power, or hopelessly naive, believe in consistency and are frightened of contradicting themselves. Clearly! the reviewer is one of those types. The reviewer believes ! I have not really ever defined power, but in fact my concept of power is clearly and rigorously developed through the course of the book-the indirect versus the direct variety, nuances of manipulation, the complete amorality of power. Perhaps the reviewer would prefer some pat definition that boils it all down to a formula, but that is not what The 48 Laws of Power is about. Power, like life, is complicated and defies easy answers. The reviewer believes I merely assume that we live in a power-hungry, amoral world, and do not offer evidence of such. But once again that is to ask for another book. This is a book about the essence of Power, and not a discourse on the need for virtue, or the lack of ethics in our world. The reader can make his own judgment on what kind of world we live in. And as I assert in the Preface, those who make a point of trying to deny that power games permeate our world, are often the most adept players of all, critics most definitely included. Perhaps the problem for the reviewer and others who find the book too strong is that The 48 Laws of Power so accurately reflects the society we live in that it elicits fear. They prefer to believe that people generally have good and noble intentions, and any kind of hint that the world is otherwise makes them very nervous and jumpy. They would rather censor the realist and Machiavellians among us, for the truth is far too dangerous.